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Discuss Advice on radiator removal please in the Central Heating Forum area at PlumbersForums.net

mashers

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Good afternoon,

I need to permanently remove a radiator from my mobile home (static caravan type thing). It has a Vaillant ecoTEC Pro 24 combi boiler running the central heating and hot water. I cannot find the drain valve to drain the system down, so am wondering if I can get around this another way. If I turn off power to the boiler to prevent the pump starting, open the bleed valve on the radiator and then drill a small hole at the bottom of the rad, this should I assume allow the water to drain down out of the rad. Since there is no upstairs there will be no pressure once the rad has drained I assume. The radiator is extremely old and is being replaced with underfloor heating, so I don't care about ruining it with a hole and it will be recycled. My question really is will this work, and if not, is there another way to properly drain the system if I can't find the drain valve for the boiler?

Thanks in advance!
 

Rob Foster

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Good afternoon,

I need to permanently remove a radiator from my mobile home (static caravan type thing). It has a Vaillant ecoTEC Pro 24 combi boiler running the central heating and hot water. I cannot find the drain valve to drain the system down, so am wondering if I can get around this another way. If I turn off power to the boiler to prevent the pump starting, open the bleed valve on the radiator and then drill a small hole at the bottom of the rad, this should I assume allow the water to drain down out of the rad. Since there is no upstairs there will be no pressure once the rad has drained I assume. The radiator is extremely old and is being replaced with underfloor heating, so I don't care about ruining it with a hole and it will be recycled. My question really is will this work, and if not, is there another way to properly drain the system if I can't find the drain valve for the boiler?

Thanks in advance!
Mashers, your project is quite simple but I worry that your basic understanding of domestic pressurised heating systems by what you state is not enough to carry out the task you describe. Also if you are having u/f heating then your contractor will do this as a matter of course. If you are in a
moby home then you will be on Propane LPG I expect so...leave your boiler alone and letnan expert deal with your problem.
I have seen the results at first hand of an LPG bang 2x in 40 years and its not nice...
Rob Foster aka centralheatking
 
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mashers

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Mashers, your project is quite simple but I worry that your basic understanding of domestic pressurised heating systems by what you state is not enough to carry out the task you describe. Also if you are having u/f heating then your contractor will do this as a matter of course. If you are in a
moby home then you will be on Propane LPG I expect so...leave your boiler alone and letnan expert deal with your problem.
I have seen the results at first hand of an LPG bang 2x in 40 years and its not nice...
Rob Foster aka centralheatking
Thanks Rob. I'm installing the underfloor heating myself (I've done it in a previous property). The boiler isn't propane, it's mains gas just like a normal house.
 

DuncanM

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Cut the pipework at the lowest point and fit a drain point. Take rad off when drained. Full back up with inhibitor being added for the amount of rads you have
 

firemant

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I wouldnt suggest ustilising these por their intended use, but are brilliant for when there no drain cocks, as in your situation:
Self-Cutting Isolating Valve 15mm 15 mm Compression isolation


Cut this in, and use valve to drain off. But first, is there any pipework UNDER the 'van. If there is, check for a drain cock there, or a compression fitting you can split. If not, either just cut away or utilise the above.
 

Craig Watson

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Cut the pipework at the lowest point and fit a drain point. Take rad off when drained. Full back up with inhibitor being added for the amount of rads you have
So you advise him to fit a drain point and then drain down and remove the radiator? :confused:
 
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mashers

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Thank you guys! The mobile is sitting on a brick wall skirt with inspection hatches, and I can't see a drain valve anywhere in any of the hatches. I might have to try to get in one of the hatches and crawl around under the house to see if I can find one, but I don't fancy that among the rats and stuff... I'll look again and see if I can at least access one of the central heating pipes down there to fit a self-cutting valve, which should then allow me to drain the system down. In the mean time, just in case I can't get that done, would draining down from the radiator itself work, as I described in my original post? I realise it's not ideal, but the whole gas system is going to be decommissioned within the next year or so once it all moves over to electric, so I don't mind ruining the radiator ;)
 

Ben-gee

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Am I missing something?
Shut both valves on the radiator, spread old towels underneath and place vessel to catch water - crack open union nut to rad and open it’s bleed valve to allow water to come out.
If you have a wet vac use this instead to catch all the water as it comes out - no mess.
If you are brave, get large bucket ( gorilla tub) undo both valve unions and lift off rad and tip into bucket - don’t do this one if white carpets! Also check there is not an earth bonding wire before you try this method.
Once rad is off, drain system through the valves.
 
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mashers

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Am I missing something?
Shut both valves on the radiator, spread old towels underneath and place vessel to catch water - crack open union nut to rad and open it’s bleed valve to allow water to come out.
If you have a wet vac use this instead to catch all the water as it comes out - no mess.
If you are brave, get large bucket ( gorilla tub) undo both valve unions and lift off rad and tip into bucket - don’t do this one if white carpets! Also check there is not an earth bonding wire before you try this method.
Once rad is off, drain system through the valves.
Good idea. I didn't think of using the rad valves to drain the system. Thanks mate!
 

Tim S

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Isolate the smallest rad on the system and drain it. Get a 3/4" or 1/2" flexi connector and fit it to the rad valve, connect a hose and drain down
 

Timmy D

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Bengee and Tim S are on the money.

I usually just crack the rad side valve nut and drain rad into a rubble sack, re- closing and emptying the bag as needed.

Once rad is empty, if needed, connect onto valve to drain rest of system.
 

Rob Foster

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It needs practice and dexterity but turn the rad valves off crack the big nuts till finger tight undo and flip the radiator upside down, one person at either end helps. When you get black sludge on the carpet gas leak detection spray is good for cleaning. Rob Foster aka centralheatking....make sure the bleed is tight shut
 

Ben-gee

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Hmmm, the above method is great if ripping out to entirely refurb a bathroom- not to be recommend in the Chumley-Warner’s parlour with Persian carpets and original 14th century wallpaper...
 

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