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Discuss Plumber has caused leaks throughout the house in the Plumbing Forum | Plumbing Advice area at PlumbersForums.net

OP
R

Reading1986

Why don’t ask your insurance provider what they recommend about paying the plumber and getting his insurance details etc?
I was planning to do that. He's called and messaged for the money. I'm already £380 down on the insurance excess. And of the insurance company deem the damage to each room separate then it will be £380 per room.
 
Darren Jackson

Darren Jackson

Esteemed
Plumber
Gas Engineer
Issue him with an invoice for the damage he has caused minus his fee.put it in writing that you will gladly pay his fee once he has rectified the damage he had caused. I would not give him a penny until you have your property back the same as it was before he started.
 
OP
R

Reading1986

Issue him with an invoice for the damage he has caused minus his fee.put it in writing that you will gladly pay his fee once he has rectified the damage he had caused. I would not give him a penny until you have your property back the same as it was before he started.
I would gladly pay his fee if he puts the damage right. Or contacts his insurance. I'm getting zero help from him. All he is saying that the filling loop caused the problem and all the damage to my house is not his problem. You cant reason with people like that at all
 
P

Phil

Plumber
I would want to have a good look at the filling loop and lets see if it is really passing, I bet he says hes thrown it away.
 
B

bacon_sandwich

Gas Engineer
My advice is that this will get worse before if gets better (financially).
I would not advise paying the plumber at all.
I would give all the plumbers details to your insurance company and let them pursue the claim against him, it takes time.
I would get confirmation from the insurance company in writing that they are going to pursue the plumber for all costs including your excess(es)
If the plumber pursues payment, you may refer them to your insurance company who are handling the case.
You are quite within your rights to be made whole at no cost to yourself.
The plumber should pay for all damage and clean up.

Reasons are: Water damage caused by opening up the heating system:
1. Water not isolated either at the filling loop or mains incoming.
2. Bleed valves left open
3. TRV's used as stop ends (totally un-acceptable)
4. Drain valves assumed shut off, rather than left open with pipe to drain.

It is true that maybe in our own home we may take short cuts like leaving TRVs open, relying on filling loop, but i have only ever done this on-site when i am the only one there and i would not leave like that, also i always leave the drain lines open until i am finished with any modifications (this is mainly due to deal with any shifting water.

Hope it all works out
 
OP
R

Reading1986

I would want to have a good look at the filling loop and lets see if it is really passing, I bet he says hes thrown it away.
Phil you are correct, I've asked for the old filling loop and he said he has thrown it away. When I asked, it was literally a few hours are he removed and replaced the filling loop. I said I needed it as the insurance company has asked for it. Which they have
Post automatically merged:

My advice is that this will get worse before if gets better (financially).
I would not advise paying the plumber at all.
I would give all the plumbers details to your insurance company and let them pursue the claim against him, it takes time.
I would get confirmation from the insurance company in writing that they are going to pursue the plumber for all costs including your excess(es)
If the plumber pursues payment, you may refer them to your insurance company who are handling the case.
You are quite within your rights to be made whole at no cost to yourself.
The plumber should pay for all damage and clean up.

Reasons are: Water damage caused by opening up the heating system:
1. Water not isolated either at the filling loop or mains incoming.
2. Bleed valves left open
3. TRV's used as stop ends (totally un-acceptable)
4. Drain valves assumed shut off, rather than left open with pipe to drain.

It is true that maybe in our own home we may take short cuts like leaving TRVs open, relying on filling loop, but i have only ever done this on-site when i am the only one there and i would not leave like that, also i always leave the drain lines open until i am finished with any modifications (this is mainly due to deal with any shifting water.

Hope it all works out
Thank you bacon_sandwich all of your information was extremely helpful. I'm no plumber, but when he came back because of the flooding and he started blaming the filling loop that when I question him about how he turned the filling loop off. All he said was I put my head in the airing cupboard saw that the filling hose was attached but turned off. "So I just left it like that" I said shouldn't you have capped off etc to ensure the system wasn't letting by and filling up. He said no. Completely understand if your "drain pipe" going outside is attached all day and your completing the works in 1 day and your present at the property. He left the house at around 2pm ish. Left bleed valve's open, trvs closed but not open. Actually I found one or 2 that were open a little. And obviously left the filling loop attached and didn't remove it and cap. Heating wasn't required over night and it was his choice to leave at 2 and come back the next day. Had made the system safe by capping etc or completing the works in one day etc. We wouldn't be in this situation. Regarding insurance etc I do intend to pass his details over to the insurance company as they have already requested this information
 
Last edited:
centralheatking

centralheatking

Esteemed
Plumber
Phil you are correct, I've asked for the old filling loop and he said he has thrown it away. When I asked, it was literally a few hours are he removed and replaced the filling loop. I said I needed it as the insurance company has asked for it. Which they have
Post automatically merged:


Thank you bacon_sandwich all of your information was extremely helpful. I'm no plumber, but when he came back because of the flooding and he started blaming the filling loop that when I question him about how he turned the filling loop off. All he said was I put my head in the airing cupboard saw that the filling hose was attached but turned off. "So I just left it like that" I said shouldn't you have capped off etc to ensure the system wasn't letting by and filling up. He said no. Completely understand if your "drain pipe" going outside is attached all day and your completing the works in 1 day and your present at the property. He left the house at around 2pm ish. Left bleed valve's open, trvs closed but not open. Actually I found one or 2 that were open a little. And obviously left the filling loop attached and didn't remove it and cap. Heating wasn't required over night and it was his choice to leave at 2 and come back the next day. Had made the system safe by capping etc or completing the works in one day etc. We wouldn't be in this situation. Regarding insurance etc I do intend to pass his details over to the insurance company as they have already requested this information
I have read all this post carefully and watched it unfold. I have been in this industry since 1981 and have employed many engineers and been responsible for 4/6 thousand systems of all sorts. Maybe more
My View.
1. Do not pay the contractor at all , inform him directly with your reasons. Ask him to reply.
2. Write a detailed diary inc. dates and times of this whole sorry episode
3. Put it into the hands of professionals ...esp. your insurance co.
4. Engage a good heating engineering outfit to a. check your system over
b. produce a report/survey
I think if this sits right with you expect nothing from this Trumpton plumber and ask nothing from him
litigation leaves everybody ...even the innocent with dirty hands...my Mrs is a (nice) barrister and always suggests this way if possible. However if this 'plumber' has assets for you to claim on go in high
and get a really aggressive legal usually with a scruffy high st office to open upon him. centralheatking
 
OP
R

Reading1986

I have read all this post carefully and watched it unfold. I have been in this industry since 1981 and have employed many engineers and been responsible for 4/6 thousand systems of all sorts. Maybe more
My View.
1. Do not pay the contractor at all , inform him directly with your reasons. Ask him to reply.
2. Write a detailed diary inc. dates and times of this whole sorry episode
3. Put it into the hands of professionals ...esp. your insurance co.
4. Engage a good heating engineering outfit to a. check your system over
b. produce a report/survey
I think if this sits right with you expect nothing from this Trumpton plumber and ask nothing from him
litigation leaves everybody ...even the innocent with dirty hands...my Mrs is a (nice) barrister and always suggests this way if possible. However if this 'plumber' has assets for you to claim on go in high
and get a really aggressive legal usually with a scruffy high st office to open upon him. centralheatking
Hello centralheatking
Thank you for help and information. I have already instructed my insurance company. They have asked for all his information and they have already said that they would open a case up with him / his insurance company to get money back that the insurance claim costs
 
OP
R

Reading1986

So my insurance have approved my claim which is one less headache which is good. Plumber has sent an invoice over, he's push the price up from £250 to £270 on the invoice. I told the plumber that I am passing the invoice over to my insurance company. I believe once the insurance claim has been sorted, they will try to recover the claim through his insurance company. Check a trade shows he has 2 million liability insurance. Invoice wise I'm still struggling to know what to do....do I pay? If my insurance recover the loses through his insurance company I will get my £380 excess back. I feel if I get my excess back then i definitely should pay his bill. But only once I get my excess back. Dose this sound unreasonable? At the moment I'm left with damage to my home, £380 excess. So I can't justify paying his invoice at the moment.
 
ShaunCorbs

ShaunCorbs

Staff member
S. Mod
Plumber
Gas Engineer
I wouldn’t not until it’s all sorted and you get your money back from his insurance then you pay
 
OP
R

Reading1986

I wouldn’t not until it’s all sorted and you get your money back from his insurance then you pay
That's what I was thinking, once everything is resolved house wise and I have my insurance excess back then of course I'd pay the invoice. Should he be pushing the invoice up? Seems strange
 
centralheatking

centralheatking

Esteemed
Plumber
That's what I was thinking, once everything is resolved house wise and I have my insurance excess back then of course I'd pay the invoice. Should he be pushing the invoice up? Seems strange
You are correct, let him know that his invoice will be settled after the insurance has been straightened out. If you pay him it might look like you are satisfied with his work. Refer him to your insurance company ...centralheatking
 

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