Discuss Water hammer advice?? (I’ve checked old posts) in the Plumbing Forum | Plumbing Advice area at PlumbersForums.net

macka09

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Plumber
Gas Engineer
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Hi all.

Just had a neighbour knock the door regarding a water hammer issue. My own house developed this issue sometime last year as well which is when the neighbours roughly started.

Severn Trent were doing bits and bobs out in the street back then but this is probably a coincidence. Our water pressure is fantastic and always has been. He did mention that I’m his kitchen tap is slightly dripping which is a ceramic cartridge type, can this be the issue?? If so, how would the cartridge cause it?

The fact neither of us have touched our stop taps or changed any taps or flush valves, I’m curious what the issue may be? Obviously we don’t know how well the existing pipe work is clipped.

I know the common issues can be the jumpers in the stop tap and failing fill valves.

Intrigued to say the least.
 
Ceramic taps can cause hammer because they can be closed abruptly, which causes the hydraulic shock that initiates the process. A faulty ceramic tap, e.g. a broken disc, can also cause a lot of noise by juddering and/or creating turbulence when opened.

Aging, or incorrectly typed, float valves are a much more common trigger.

The fact that two properties started experiencing problems at the same time makes it possible that Severn Trent directly or indirectly jacked up your supply pressure. Maybe they fixed a biggish leak, maybe a significant new consumer has been joined to the network, maybe the regulator at their pumping station is faulty.

Anyway, I'd check / service / replace any float valves first. Next, I'd put a gauge on the supply and quantify the 'fantastic' pressure. The chance of hammer increases dramatically as the supply pressure rises. If it's very high, let Severn Trent know as they will want to reduce it a bit. If they weren't interested, I'd fit my own pressure reduction valve.

Don't forget to check the clipping (intervals and tightness) of your pipes.
 
Ceramic taps can cause hammer because they can be closed abruptly, which causes the hydraulic shock that initiates the process. A faulty ceramic tap, e.g. a broken disc, can also cause a lot of noise by juddering and/or creating turbulence when opened.

Aging, or incorrectly typed, float valves are a much more common trigger.

The fact that two properties started experiencing problems at the same time makes it possible that Severn Trent directly or indirectly jacked up your supply pressure. Maybe they fixed a biggish leak, maybe a significant new consumer has been joined to the network, maybe the regulator at their pumping station is faulty.

Anyway, I'd check / service / replace any float valves first. Next, I'd put a gauge on the supply and quantify the 'fantastic' pressure. The chance of hammer increases dramatically as the supply pressure rises. If it's very high, let Severn Trent know as they will want to reduce it a bit. If they weren't interested, I'd fit my own pressure reduction valve.

Don't forget to check the clipping (intervals and tightness) of your pipes.
Thanks for the reply.

It certainly is fantastic pressure lol.

I will check the standing and dynamic pressure on my own property tomorrow.

There was a few mains leaks in one of the roads last year come to think of it.

I appreciate the advice thanks.
 

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