Discuss What's the most convenient way for me to plumb drainage channel? in the General DIY Plumbing Forum area at Plumbers Forums

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Just about to install 5m of drainage channel between house and patio. The main reason for it is for the external tap at the side of the house. I think it would normally go to 110mm soil pipe, but for all it will be draining (not much, the occasional garden tool rinsing and minimal patio water) i guess i shoul just run a pipe under the patio going to a sump? Does this sound reasonable?
 
AFAIK, new (and changes to) underground drains need advance approval from your local authority building control office. Ask them what the minimum size allowed is. My guess is they'll want at least 110mm. You'd normally have a suitable gulley under the tap and an inspection pit where the new run connects into the existing system.
 
It just took me ages to work out what AFAIK meant! And I thought I was fairly down with the kids LOL!

I think it is As Far As I Know

Sorry for the thread hijack there..

Is the Building Control department the same department as Planning?
 
Is the Building Control department the same department as Planning?
No, separate departments and not always in the same building (or town). These days they have websites with contact info, appointment booking forms, etc.

Useful abbreviations:

AFAIK = As far as I know
FYI = For your information
IME = In my experience
IMO = In my opinion
YMMV = Your mileage may vary
 
No, separate departments and not always in the same building (or town). These days they have websites with contact info, appointment booking forms, etc.

Useful abbreviations:

AFAIK = As far as I know
FYI = For your information
IME = In my experience
IMO = In my opinion
YMMV = Your mileage may vary
Thanks for those! A few there I didn't know!

Just found out our house is on the edge of a conservation zone so i might need to know about those different departments one day!
 
AFAIK, new (and changes to) underground drains need advance approval from your local authority building control office. Ask them what the minimum size allowed is. My guess is they'll want at least 110mm. You'd normally have a suitable gulley under the tap and an inspection pit where the new run connects into the existing system.
Chuck, this tallies up with my understanding. The local water authority needs to know how much water is going into each drain to mitigate against flooding. This is entirely understandable, and sensible. I am in Scotland so when I look at the Goverment flowcharts, it's classed as "Hard Surface: Paving patios & driveways". When looking at the flowchart, i see "Has provision been made for direct run off into a permeable or porous area?". If i say yes, then planning permission is not required, ie it is a permitted development. The word "direct" bothers me a bit here, as if i run a drain/pipe does that make it "indirect"? Anyway, my garden soil is, i would say about 60-70% clay, so i am considering running a pipe outside the fence to the small woodland outside my garden. It is at a lower level, so that would make it work (I think, i havent done detailed calculations yet). If i knew the process better, i would like to add it to the gutter downpipe, as im not keen on soil pipe smell making its way to the patio on a summers day. Not sure if this is allowed though, and if it has to go to the soil pipe? I would imagine if i did apply for planning it would be granted due to the tiny amount of run off.
 
I am in Scotland so when I look at the Goverment flowcharts, it's classed as "Hard Surface: Paving patios & driveways".
In England I believe that you will need Building Regulations approval (from the LA Building Control Dept) for your proposed changes but probably not Planning Permission (from the LA Planning Dept). I would strongly recommend that you don't rely on your own interpretation of a website without booking an appointment with Building Control and discussing the plans with them.

Installing a pipe to drain water from your property onto someone else's (wood)land without getting a proper legal agreement would be a hard 'No' in England but, I have no idea what the law in Scotland is.

Getting this stuff wrong can store up a lot of expensive trouble for the future.
 
In England I believe that you will need Building Regulations approval (from the LA Building Control Dept) for your proposed changes but probably not Planning Permission (from the LA Planning Dept). I would strongly recommend that you don't rely on your own interpretation of a website without booking an appointment with Building Control and discussing the plans with them.

Installing a pipe to drain water from your property onto someone else's (wood)land without getting a proper legal agreement would be a hard 'No' in England but, I have no idea what the law in Scotland is.

Getting this stuff wrong can store up a lot of expensive trouble for the future.
Your almost certainly correct. Where would drainage channel "normally" be connected to? Is the gutter downpipe an option with building control approval or does it have to be soil pipe? At this stage I'm only looking for options.
 
So after googling this (it took a surprisingly long time), i've learned that all builds post 1970 have seperate soil/waste and rainwater systems. An external tap is classed as waste due to potential oil/debris contamination, so has to be connected to the soil/waste 'stack'. So I think that answers that question. So to connect up I have to gain some kind of approval from a council (utility?) department, which i guess will involve some kind of signed certificate? I think my understanding is almost there, with just a bit more help i think we can get through this.
 
After having another look, The scottish Government classify surface as rainwater. Confusing? Then they refer the reader to National Annex of BS EN 752: 2008, which when i go there find out it has been withdrawn and superseeded by the 2022 version. I spoke to a neighbour and that cleared things up quite simply. Thanks for your help.
 
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