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Discuss Thinking of having Electric combie boiler, should I run a separate electric shower? in the DIY Bathroom Remodelling Advice area at PlumbersForums.net

Hi,
I thinking about having an electric combi boiler fitted instead of gas in a new flat I'm building. This is because I heard the government is moving this way in a few years, and well one less utility to worry about, and no carbon monoxide position risk sounds good to me.

Anyway I gather it will be more expensive to run, but it also seems much more complex than the good ol' gas combi. If i was going gas I'd get a nice Valiant or Worcester and thats heating/hotwater taken care of. With electric it seems I need a hot water tank, maybe a slim heating element. And now I'm thinking if I had a 120l tank, should I opt for a electric shower so it never runs out of hot water? I mean why is this even this complicated? but I digress. What do you think?
 

chris watkins

Esteemed
Plumber
Hi,
I thinking about having an electric combi boiler fitted instead of gas in a new flat I'm building. This is because I heard the government is moving this way in a few years, and well one less utility to worry about, and no carbon monoxide position risk sounds good to me.

Anyway I gather it will be more expensive to run, but it also seems much more complex than the good ol' gas combi. If i was going gas I'd get a nice Valiant or Worcester and thats heating/hotwater taken care of. With electric it seems I need a hot water tank, maybe a slim heating element. And now I'm thinking if I had a 120l tank, should I opt for a electric shower so it never runs out of hot water? I mean why is this even this complicated? but I digress. What do you think?
It isn't complicated if you understand the limitations of the electrical power supply to any flat or house.
Why don't you get some quotes from the Plumbers / Heating engineers you would be using if you when down the gas route ?
or were you hoping to install it all yourself.
 

Murdoch

Res.Electrician
Contributing as a spark

I would never recommend an electric boiler when gas is available and if you do go down the electric only route what is the size of your incoming electrical supply?
 

SimonG

Plumber
Advent Win
Elnur Gabbaron CMX18. Electric combi. Fitted one for customer who didn't have room for oil tank. Worked very well.

Direct unvented cylinder with amptec electric boiler for heating. Again, worked well.

You will struggle to have an electric boiler and electric shower without popping your main fuse.
 

gmartine

Gas Engineer
You say you're building a flat so is it a new build or a conversion that may already have adequate services?
 
Second Murdochs comments. Domestic electrical supplies are normally limited to 100A, often even 60A. Simplistically that’s only 24KW (or 16KW at 60A).

You would have to choose between having your boiler or shower on at any time. Your electrical supply would struggle to support both. That’s before you’ve added an electric hob or lights or sockets.
 
ah, thanks for the, its something I hadn't considered. we will be having a electric oven, induction hob as well.
I did check with the electric supplier about the boiler and they said it would be fine for a electric boiler.
And yes I'm looking for a local installer, but my current guys are gas gas gas all the way.
I wanted to stay away from gas as I said due to the incoming gov regulations and no need for flu, or 2nd service.
cheers all for your replies.
 
ah, thanks for the, its something I hadn't considered. we will be having a electric oven, induction hob as well.
I did check with the electric supplier about the boiler and they said it would be fine for a electric boiler.
And yes I'm looking for a local installer, but my current guys are gas gas gas all the way.
I wanted to stay away from gas as I said due to the incoming gov regulations and no need for flu, or 2nd service.
cheers all for your replies.
Any change to building regulations will not be retrospectively applied. There is talk of prohibiting the installation of new domestic gas appliances but given there is not realistic alternative in many cases I’d be surprised if this actually happens in the next 10 years.
 
hi, yes I understand the regulation wouldn't be applicable to me now or in the future. but i actually like the idea of the regulation, i.e. moving away from gas to renewable. I just struggle with as you mention a decent alternative. I assumed due to the incoming regulation this was sorted, but my own research shows it still a complicated mess compared to gas.
 
hi, yes I understand the regulation wouldn't be applicable to me now or in the future. but i actually like the idea of the regulation, i.e. moving away from gas to renewable. I just struggle with as you mention a decent alternative. I assumed due to the incoming regulation this was sorted, but my own research shows it still a complicated mess compared to gas.
Modern domestic gas appliances have really impressive efficacy ratings. If you want to be green look at insulation and glazing. Until 3 phase electrical supplies become more readily available in a domestic environment electric heating/cars etc is going to be a huge headache.
 
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Modern domestic gas appliances have really impressive efficacy ratings. If you want to be green look at insulation and glazing. Until 3 phase electrical supplies become more readily available in a domestic environment electric heating/cars etc is going to be a huge headache.
I am trying but I just can't take you seriously as unbiased information with that username lol.
But yes we are fully insulated. And ready to go on most fronts, I'm just stalling at the boiler choice.
 
I am trying but I just can't take you seriously as unbiased information with that username lol.
But yes we are fully insulated. And ready to go on most fronts, I'm just stalling at the boiler choice.
It’s not really for me to convince you it’s common sense. Modern boilers 90%+ of the energy you put in comes out as useful heat.

Wind is great but fairly sparse on very cold days when heating is most in demand. Some of the UKs electrical demand is supplied by biomass (another fudge/scam) and the rest by natural gas.

With current electrical supplies to properties it’s not even really a choice. Unless you want to go down the route of heat pumps or biomass you’re pretty much stuck with gas.
 

SimonG

Plumber
Advent Win
I'd just shot an oil boiler in.

If you have a gas supply then use it.

May be better to look at air source heat pump.
 

centralheatking

Esteemed
Plumber
Hi,
I thinking about having an electric combi boiler fitted instead of gas in a new flat I'm building. This is because I heard the government is moving this way in a few years, and well one less utility to worry about, and no carbon monoxide position risk sounds good to me.

Anyway I gather it will be more expensive to run, but it also seems much more complex than the good ol' gas combi. If i was going gas I'd get a nice Valiant or Worcester and thats heating/hotwater taken care of. With electric it seems I need a hot water tank, maybe a slim heating element. And now I'm thinking if I had a 120l tank, should I opt for a electric shower so it never runs out of hot water? I mean why is this even this complicated? but I digress. What do you think?
I saw this post and thought I would wait (on holiday) anyway I really cannot see an electric combi working in a domestic situation in uk.
The sheer amount of electricity needed will blow the socks out of your
supply...100Amp at 240. Now in USA they have 3 phase to a lot of homes and maybe thats where you saw this. Next problem the cost
even tho electricity is green etc the price is artificially high and expensive...so nat gas is way cheaper...and always remember that when you come to sell up...nobody will want your property as you intend. ..go for gas as the next stage will be hydrogen enhanced nat gas that burns cleaner and can be used in any current appliance once it has been re jetted. that is the future ..centralheatking
 

Chalked

Esteemed
Plumber
Gas Engineer
I Ike your ethical approach. But if you run the house on electric. You will be paying nearly double the running cost.
Doesn’t take a lot of working out when electricity is around 13- 15p a kw.
So running 24 kw at 13p is over £3 an hour!
 

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