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Discuss Removing Jurassic bathtaps, frustrated and confused. in the Plumbing Forum | Plumbing Advice area at PlumbersForums.net

centralheatking

Esteemed
Plumber
I have been clicking Likes on all the responses, but I would like to thank everyone properly too. The forum is obviously full of valuable information already, but new questions will always come up, even if the answers are familiar to many of you. I appreciate you taking the time to help me out.

Today I have started looking around online for possible replacements and the various options are all looking like a proper investment. Even some nasty looking old globe taps, "in need of refurbishment", were priced at £60 on EBay... and they looked worse than mine! And a new set of Bib taps will set me back from £120-£180. So I may be asking a few more questions before I start getting my card details ready. Forgive me if some of them sound a bit stupid, the easy ones are only easy if you know the answer (like "Who Wants To Be A Millionaire").
Keep on asking ...your questions are the life blood of PF ...and of course our answers
centralheatking
 
I haven't made much progress on this project. I had no access time until last night. So I took some measurements and a couple of photographs, but did not get a chance to have another go at dismantling the tap mechanism. Investigations make it clear that even if I find a set of taps, I don't have much room to get a connection to the existing pipework (more on that later).

So my next step - I think - is to put in a stop valve on the Hot feed. This will allow me to stop the dripping hot tap and isolate it while I carry on trying to work on fixing/replacing the tap. I need to be able to "abort the mission" at a moment's notice. I want to ask the forum about the possible pitfalls.
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In the picture above, I will start by stopping the main stopcock (D), with the tap (A) open. I plan to make a cut at (B). How do I calculate how much water will come out?
 

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Darren Jackson

Esteemed
Plumber
Gas Engineer
Advent Win
You do not need to work this out if you follow these instructions as very little water will leak out using this method.

Turn off your stop cock 'D' then open 'A' to relieve the pressure and also confirms 'D' has shut off properly. Then when the water has stopped running close 'A' tight, this will create a vacuum and hold most of the standing water in (like when you hold a finger on a straw it keeps the liquid in the straw until you move your finger and it then runs out). Then having your new stop valve ready, (I recommend using a compression full bore lever valve) and in the closed position. a shallow container like a roasting dish is ideal placed under where you are going to cut the pipe to catch the small amount of spillage or if no clearance under the pipe then an old towel will suffice. Then quickly cut the pipe and put on the new stop valve immediately on the boiler side of the pipe first as most water will be in that side of the pipework this can be done in seconds and very little spillage will occur if you are quick enough and the stop tap is already in the off position. hand tight the nut on that side and another 1/2 turn with a spanner. Then push in the tap side of the pipe and hand tight that nut plus a 1/2 turn with a spanner. if done quickly and properly very little spillage will happen. Turn back on 'D' open 'A' to purge the air until a steady stream of water flows and turn off 'A' again and check for any weeping compression joints on the new stop valve. If weeping occurs give it another 1/4 turn with a spanner this should do the trick. and all should be good to go. Important to not over tighten the nut and olive on a compression fitting.
 
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You do not need to work this out if you follow these instructions as very little water will leak out using this method.

Turn off your stop cock 'D' then open 'A' to relieve the pressure and also confirms 'D' has shut off properly. Then when the water has stopped running close 'A' tight, this will create a vacuum and hold most of the standing water in (like when you hold a finger on a straw it keeps the liquid in the straw until you move your finger and it then runs out). Then having your new stop valve ready, (I recommend using a compression full bore lever valve) and in the closed position. a shallow container like a roasting dish is ideal placed under where you are going to cut the pipe to catch the small amount of spillage or if no clearance under the pipe then an old towel will suffice. Then quickly cut the pipe and put on the new stop valve immediately on the boiler side of the pipe first as most water will be in that side of the pipework this can be done in seconds and very little spillage will occur if you are quick enough and the stop tap is already in the off position. hand tight the nut on that side and another 1/2 turn with a spanner. Then push in the tap side of the pipe and hand tight that nut plus a 1/2 turn with a spanner. if done quickly and properly very little spillage will happen. Turn back on 'D' open 'A' to purge the air until a steady stream of water flows and turn off 'A' again and check for any weeping compression joints on the new stop valve. If weeping occurs give it another 1/4 turn with a spanner this should do the trick. and all should be good to go. Important to not over tighten the nut and olive on a compression fitting.
Brilliant! That was a terrific description and I feel truly enlightened. Than my o u very much indeed.
 

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