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Discuss Radiator pipes at different levels? in the Fittings & Pipes area at PlumbersForums.net

tp01

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Hi there

Looking for some advice on connecting a radiator.

Have finally got round to replacing a really old radiator wher I assumed the bracket had slipped as the whole thing was at an angle. However when I hung the new one I realised the pipes are at different heights and whoever installed the last one just hung it at an angle rather than adjust pipe work.

The pipes come up through the floor, but there doesn’t appear to be enough play to level them (one side has some the other none and I don’t want to push too hard!).

There’s probably 50mm horizontal play with a 20mm height difference. So not much room. Is there such a thing as a short flexible connector (I’ve used telescopic ones before) or is the only option to trim the pipe?

Many thanks in advance and apologies if posted in the wrong place!

Cheers
 

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Normally you check the lowest pipe and hang radiator to that level.
If lowest pipe height is reasonable, then cut other pipe to same level
 
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tp01

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Thanks for quick reply.

Luckily I hung it to the lower of the 2 pipes. I assume the only way to cut pipe is to drain the system? Or is it possible to isolate it somehow? The pipes are currently switched off and capped.

Cheers.
 

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Depends if system is a sealed type or if it is open vented.
If open vented you might be best draining to that level or use freeze gear to enable you to cut pipe and lower valve.
On sealed system it is easier and you could take system pressure to zero.
A plumber wouldn’t need to drain
 
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tp01

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Ok, thanks. 99% sure it’s a sealed system. It’s a Worcester Junior combi - no tanks in loft or anything. Is it just a case of looking at the pressure gauge and reducing to a certain level? It’s an upstairs room if that makes any difference.

Thanks for your help and trust me, if I’m not sure I’ll jus call a pro! Just exploring all options.
 

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Ok, thanks. 99% sure it’s a sealed system. It’s a Worcester Junior combi - no tanks in loft or anything. Is it just a case of looking at the pressure gauge and reducing to a certain level? It’s an upstairs room if that makes any difference.

Thanks for your help and trust me, if I’m not sure I’ll jus call a pro! Just exploring all options.
Yes, you can try taking the heating system pressure fully down and then carefully remove rad valve on your longer pipe to see if water holds back.
Plenty of old towels and tools at hand and another person with you to help is advisable.
Frankly it is a job a pro could do for you properly and at a low cost
 
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Not really, you will have to drain your system, all the central heating water from all the system above and level with your naughty rad.
and a bit below to be sure. When you top it up be sure to re introduce the new inhibitor chemicals ...You might as well flush it thro while you are at it...do it soon Winter is on its way
centralheatking
 
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tp01

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Yep, thanks - was already thinking I could get it done at same time as annual service. Thanks for all your help.

Cheers.
 

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