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My daughter wanted a quote for a replacement oil fired boiler. The heating engineer who she knows and trusts says that the existing tank is too close to the flue outlet and is not a double skin tank. He says that he is not allowed to replace the boiler unless she moves the position of the tank and replaces it with a double skin tank. He said he has to provide details to the Local Authority. My understanding was that if you were having a boiler replaced then it was not mandatory to make changes to an existing oil tank, am I wrong. The cost would be much more and to be honest she can’t really afford to pay for so much work. Any advice would be much appreciacted.
 
Flue termination MUST not be within 1.8m of a tank. If this cant be achieved then then a fire rated barrier of at least 30 minutes must be provided, extending 300mm higher and wider than both ends of the tank
 

SimonG

Plumber
Advent Win
As above.

However the rules really need looking at again for the simple reason that condensing boilers were not around when the 1.8m was set. Condensing boilers have a much lower flue gas temperature.

But oftec wont do that as it will lessen their revenue.

Could always fit a fire proof barrier, concrete fencing or a plume kit on the flue outlet.
Post automatically merged:

Just to say as well, most boilers I fit dont have compliant tanks. I wouldn't have a flue within 1.8m of an oil tank without a plum management kit.

I just document the non compliance of the tank and move on.
 
Hi again.

Many moons ago it was mandatory for any existing non compliant tanks to be brought up to standards when installing a new boiler. This is now not the case, unless an IR (immediate risk), otherwise as Simon said you would just note it down on the paperwork.
You do still have a problem though. As I said above if the flue terminal is within 1.8m of the tank then no one should be installing it like that.
You have several options.
1. Install some sort of fire rated boundary as I mentioned above separating the two.
2. As SimonG said install a plume management kit which would safely disharge at least 1.8m away, which I purposely didn't mention until I spoke to an associate.
Or 3. I have spoke to an associate to clarify minimum distances for fire rated tanks. A triple skinned, metal fired rated tank for example requires flue terminals to be at least 100mm away, not the 1.8m plastic tanks require, double bunded or single.
Having said that building regulations now state that ANY new tank installation requires at least 300mm clearance on all sides for fuel delivery companies to inspect the tank. Be aware though that fire rated tanks cannot be certified by OFTEC and have to be signed off through your local building control.
At the moment these are your options, unless you reposition the tank of course.
If you decide on a fire rated tank I can happily pass the details of my associates company onto you.
 
Hi again.

Many moons ago it was mandatory for any existing non compliant tanks to be brought up to standards when installing a new boiler. This is now not the case, unless an IR (immediate risk), otherwise as Simon said you would just note it down on the paperwork.
You do still have a problem though. As I said above if the flue terminal is within 1.8m of the tank then no one should be installing it like that.
You have several options.
1. Install some sort of fire rated boundary as I mentioned above separating the two.
2. As SimonG said install a plume management kit which would safely disharge at least 1.8m away, which I purposely didn't mention until I spoke to an associate.
Or 3. I have spoke to an associate to clarify minimum distances for fire rated tanks. A triple skinned, metal fired rated tank for example requires flue terminals to be at least 100mm away, not the 1.8m plastic tanks require, double bunded or single.
Having said that building regulations now state that ANY new tank installation requires at least 300mm clearance on all sides for fuel delivery companies to inspect the tank. Be aware though that fire rated tanks cannot be certified by OFTEC and have to be signed off through your local building control.
At the moment these are your options, unless you reposition the tank of course.
If you decide on a fire rated tank I can happily pass the details of my associates company onto you.
Thanks for the very detailed explanation
 
Thanks for the very detailed explanation
No worries. Simon and I are just trying to give you the friendly advice you need to make a decision. I personally know of three oil tank fires in the last 6 months due to improper installation (not my work of course). The last thing we want to hear is it all went horribly wrong for you.
 
No worries. Simon and I are just trying to give you the friendly advice you need to make a decision. I personally know of three oil tank fires in the last 6 months due to improper installation (not my work of course). The last thing we want to hear is it all went horribly wrong for you.
Wow that’s a sobering thought!
 
Wow that’s a sobering thought!
A very sobering thought yes. These fires were down to cowboy insrallers and reckless homeowners. There was actually a fourth fire at my sisters as well, although her oil tank installation was compliant with proper spill and fire protection and no oil fueled the fire.
 

Stigster

Esteemed
Plumber
What are they up to? Lighting bonfires next to the tank or what? I've seen countless non-compliant tanks over the years and filled out my OFTEC paperwork accordingly but none that have actually caught fire even if the potential was there.

Don't worry, I totally believe it because when it comes to oil there's some shocking stuff out there but like I say, none that have actually gone up. The most common potential cause for an oil tank fire I have seen is lack of base and foliage/grass growing right up to the tank, grass catches fire from a bonfire left unattended and up she goes when the fire reaches the base of the tank.
 
There was actually one fire that was caused by reckless homeowners and a bonfire about 6 weeks ago. Oil tank caught fire and set the house ablaze, the fire speed to a further 3 houses as well as burning oil entering the drainage systems. Firefighters not only had to deal with four houses on fire but exploding manhole covers as well.
 

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