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Discuss New build house smell in the Plumbing Forum | Plumbing Advice area at PlumbersForums.net

Messages
370
So what your been told is if there is a blockage its ok for the aav to leak contaminated water inside boxing's ect?
Maybe not.
The s&v could be taken through the roof will depend on how easy route is.
Or a external vent pipe taken from inspection chamber at head of drain i think your in whatever is easiest territory!
 

Ric2013

Plumber
Messages
2,958
We have been told that although it is below the washhand basin it is ok because its only in case of flood?
I'd be inclined to agree that the height of the vent isn't the cause of the smell issue. The lack of accessibility is not something I would ignore. When the membrane in the AAV wears out (give it ten years), you'll be ripping out the panelling to get to the AAV. The drainage system needs to be ventilated at the head of the drain, which will be the house furthest from the pumping station.

If you are an intermediate house, why not have the AAV in the loft? Then it's hidden but easily accessible. You've only got to run the stack through a bit of plasterboard, presumably.

If you are the furthest house and need the open vent, then up through the loft, through the tiles, and terminate above the roof line, with a roofer to form a lead flashing to seal around the pipe. Or as #73. Make sure the distance from windows etc as in ADH are complied with as the open vent will be smelly if it serves several houses.
 
Messages
48
I'd be inclined to agree that the height of the vent isn't the cause of the smell issue. The lack of accessibility is not something I would ignore. When the membrane in the AAV wears out (give it ten years), you'll be ripping out the panelling to get to the AAV. The drainage system needs to be ventilated at the head of the drain, which will be the house furthest from the pumping station.

If you are an intermediate house, why not have the AAV in the loft? Then it's hidden but easily accessible. You've only got to run the stack through a bit of plasterboard, presumably.

If you are the furthest house and need the open vent, then up through the loft, through the tiles, and terminate above the roof line, with a roofer to form a lead flashing to seal around the pipe. Or as #73. Make sure the distance from windows etc as in ADH are complied with as the open vent will be smelly if it serves several houses.

I'd be inclined to agree that the height of the vent isn't the cause of the smell issue. The lack of accessibility is not something I would ignore. When the membrane in the AAV wears out (give it ten years), you'll be ripping out the panelling to get to the AAV. The drainage system needs to be ventilated at the head of the drain, which will be the house furthest from the pumping station.

If you are an intermediate house, why not have the AAV in the loft? Then it's hidden but easily accessible. You've only got to run the stack through a bit of plasterboard, presumably.

If you are the furthest house and need the open vent, then up through the loft, through the tiles, and terminate above the roof line, with a roofer to form a lead flashing to seal around the pipe. Or as #73. Make sure the distance from windows etc as in ADH are complied with as the open vent will be smelly if it serves several houses.
We only knew we had an AAV when we complained about the smell and the plumber replaced it, no change to the smell. I know it seems silly but we bought the house on 'good' advice, recommendation and reputation. We dont know what the drainage system is particularly and trying to find out is just so difficult. The building control company Stroma supposedly completed final check but they are not coming forward.
There are three houses number 1 is furthest, number 2 has the pump station and we are number three, we have the worst smell and are the highest (land wise).
We are so frustrated by the whole thing, I would move but my Husband wants to stay, we have only been here since January!
 
Messages
48
So what your been told is if there is a blockage its ok for the aav to leak contaminated water inside boxing's ect?
Maybe not.
The s&v could be taken through the roof will depend on how easy route is.
Or a external vent pipe taken from inspection chamber at head of drain i think your in whatever is easiest territory!
Oh yuk! 'They' said its only a warning sign and the flood would be water downstairs and we would notice it before it got to the bathroom...so gullible we are!
Where would the inspection chamber be at head of drain? Is that in the garden.
 
Messages
370
You should have at least one inspection chamber if you have more than one it's probably the one furthest from the pump station that you need for the vent,
They can be quite small (320mm) if drains are shallow.
 

Ric2013

Plumber
Messages
2,958
I hate new builds. They ought to be good but...
There are three houses number 1 is furthest, number 2 has the pump station and we are number three, we have the worst smell and are the highest (land wise).
So your house needs an open vent. Basically.

Normally, ICs will be something like this:

ICs.png

The red line is the sewer, the blue ones is each house's soil stack to the nearest IC, and there will be a vent either at green dot at the head (house 3) or a separate vent pipe to the IC (yellow). My terminology may not be exact, but you get the idea. I'm showing conventional 600x450mm IC covers, but yours may be small plastic round things as it's a new property. Basically, there will/should be access wherever there is a branch or abrupt change in direction.

It was suggested a HepVo valve could be fitted under your sink in series with the existing trap. This will certainly work if the issue is pressure developing and forcing through the trap. It's a one-way valve. They are expensive but work well. It may shift the problem elsewhere though (possibily to a neighbour...)

What if you find your IC and lift the lid slightly to allow some air to exit? Make sure to cover with a wire mesh though (rats...). This should have a similar effect to the yellow pipe in the above drawing. It's not a permanent solution and it will make the immediate vicinity of the garden smelly, but if it means your house doesn't smell of drains - which, long term, isn't going to be that good for you - it may just keep you sane while you arrange a permanent solution (and may be a good way of convincing your idiot builder that he needs to vent the head of the drain... which, by the way, is in the level 2 plumbing course, so not exactly a difficult concept).
 
Messages
48
I hate new builds. They ought to be good but...

So your house needs an open vent. Basically.

Normally, ICs will be something like this:

View attachment 62437

The red line is the sewer, the blue ones is each house's soil stack to the nearest IC, and there will be a vent either at green dot at the head (house 3) or a separate vent pipe to the IC (yellow). My terminology may not be exact, but you get the idea. I'm showing conventional 600x450mm IC covers, but yours may be small plastic round things as it's a new property. Basically, there will/should be access wherever there is a branch or abrupt change in direction.

It was suggested a HepVo valve could be fitted under your sink in series with the existing trap. This will certainly work if the issue is pressure developing and forcing through the trap. It's a one-way valve. They are expensive but work well. It may shift the problem elsewhere though (possibily to a neighbour...)

What if you find your IC and lift the lid slightly to allow some air to exit? Make sure to cover with a wire mesh though (rats...). This should have a similar effect to the yellow pipe in the above drawing. It's not a permanent solution and it will make the immediate vicinity of the garden smelly, but if it means your house doesn't smell of drains - which, long term, isn't going to be that good for you - it may just keep you sane while you arrange a permanent solution (and may be a good way of convincing your idiot builder that he needs to vent the head of the drain... which, by the way, is in the level 2 plumbing course, so not exactly a difficult concept).
That is very easy to understand.***.lets hope our idiot builder does also, when he ever answers us! Thank you
 
Messages
48
I hate new builds. They ought to be good but...

So your house needs an open vent. Basically.

Normally, ICs will be something like this:

View attachment 62437

The red line is the sewer, the blue ones is each house's soil stack to the nearest IC, and there will be a vent either at green dot at the head (house 3) or a separate vent pipe to the IC (yellow). My terminology may not be exact, but you get the idea. I'm showing conventional 600x450mm IC covers, but yours may be small plastic round things as it's a new property. Basically, there will/should be access wherever there is a branch or abrupt change in direction.

It was suggested a HepVo valve could be fitted under your sink in series with the existing trap. This will certainly work if the issue is pressure developing and forcing through the trap. It's a one-way valve. They are expensive but work well. It may shift the problem elsewhere though (possibily to a neighbour...)

What if you find your IC and lift the lid slightly to allow some air to exit? Make sure to cover with a wire mesh though (rats...). This should have a similar effect to the yellow pipe in the above drawing. It's not a permanent solution and it will make the immediate vicinity of the garden smelly, but if it means your house doesn't smell of drains - which, long term, isn't going to be that good for you - it may just keep you sane while you arrange a permanent solution (and may be a good way of convincing your idiot builder that he needs to vent the head of the drain... which, by the way, is in the level 2 plumbing course, so not exactly a difficult concept).
One last question, hope you dont mind. The Agent for the Council building control (Stroma) now tell us its nothing to do with them and they cant check every detail on their final check. He did say that on the plans (which he wont give us) there is, or meant to be as he didn't check, an SVP in the small attic above our garden room. There is a small hatch in the ceiling but we have never looked in. He said that there should be a vent tile on the outside, there isn't. Any ideas would be great thanks. We are going to try to look inside that hatch later but it is very high!
 
Messages
370
If there is a vent tile or even a ridge vent easily identified from outside just looks different!
When you look in roof space if vent exists should be easy to see 110mm pipe.
As for building inspector absolute rubbish . They inspect buildings at a number of stages if vent exists it probably went in at first fix stage so should have been seen at pre plaster inspection.
When they sign a building off they are confirming its built to what the plans and specifications say and its to current regulations.
Maybe time for a word with the solicitor who did the conveyancing?
 
Messages
48
If there is a vent tile or even a ridge vent easily identified from outside just looks different!
When you look in roof space if vent exists should be easy to see 110mm pipe.
As for building inspector absolute rubbish . They inspect buildings at a number of stages if vent exists it probably went in at first fix stage so should have been seen at pre plaster inspection.
When they sign a building off they are confirming its built to what the plans and specifications say and its to current regulations.
Maybe time for a word with the solicitor who did the conveyancing?
Well, we looked in roof space, nothing to see inside or out. Stroma have sent plans, there should be two svp with roof vents. No AAV on plan yet we have one. The conveyancor is on holiday! We e-mailed builder as its only way to contact him, no reply as yet. Stroma have said its not their job to sort this out. It's getting to the point of moving but how with this smell.
 
Messages
370
Absolutely dreadful Stroma do have a responsibility they signed of a property not built to plan that did nor meet building regulations.
Any back up guarantee n h b c or similar?
 
Messages
48
Absolutely dreadful Stroma do have a responsibility they signed of a property not built to plan that did nor meet building regulations.
Any back up guarantee n h b c or similar?
Only an architects guarantee, that is not for 10yrs. We really dont want a fight but just to get it sorted out. With all the great info you have given us we have at least got an understanding of what should be happening. The plans are very different to what we actually have in many respects, build wise. We relied on local knowledge of the builder, we moved 500miles. Had the dishwasher on last evening and the smell drifted into the kitchen. Do you think a vent on the pump station would help, that is in the garden next door?
We really appreciate your time in helping us.
 

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