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Discuss Header tank/Hot water cylinder in the Plumbing Forum area at PlumbersForums.net

Sam Whitmore

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Good morning, was hoping someone could tell me the minimum height the header tank needs to be above the hot water (indirect) cylinder. Many thanks in anticipation. Sam
 

hammers4spanner

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Not sure if its a minimum height above your cylinder would be more thinking taps and shower height .
The higher the better pressure at your taps etc
 
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Sam Whitmore

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Currently the header tank is in the loft but I've plans to use that space and wanted to relocate the header tank which re-fills the central heating system to just above the hot water cylinder
 

hammers4spanner

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Sorry misread your question yes their is i think its pump to water level if i recall depends on what pump you have
 

chris watkins

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Have the system converted to a seal one, it really is beneficial to loose the F&E altogether Sam.
& you could then extend the heating up into the loft.
 
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Sam Whitmore

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Hi Chris, for various reasons, cost being one I'd like to continue with an open vented system. I've about a gap of a metre above the cylinder but wasn't sure the header tank needed to be higher.
 

Riley

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Not sure that cost would be dramatically different to labour for moving existing
 

chris watkins

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There is no real height requirement other than it must provide enough head pressure to allow the top most parts of the system to fill with water, which would presumable be the upstairs rads not the cylinder coil.

The issue is more to do with the correct pipework design & installation, all intended to keep as much of the system under positive pressure when the pump is running at the same time ensuring that when it starts up water is not pushed out from the safety open vent pipe into the cistern. Lastly as much as possible of the extra water created when the system is heated remains in the within the cold feed as water moving up into the cistern when hot & then back into the circulating water when cold would introduce oxygen & promote corrosion.
 

chris watkins

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The oversized combined feed & vents can be useful in this but we would need to see your present system set up to advise further.
 

Best

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F&E tank supposed to be at least a metre above the highest circuits in your heating system.
But extra long feed pipe is often better to ensure less air ingress into system.
But it depends on how it is all piped on your system.

You would be best to have your heating system sealed if it is gas or oil system.
There is very little cost to this normally.
The system will need to be sound though, - no slight weeps anywhere and radiator valves all with proper sealing glands, so no pressure loss
 

Rob Foster

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Look, what you should consider is how high you can locate your tank...not how low ..done the odd one over the years at min. spec height and they worked but the performance really was rubbish
in my opinion...or just rip it all out and go unvented
chking
 

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