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Discuss Boiler condensation pipe into a shared gutter down pipe in the Plumbing Forum | Plumbing Advice area at PlumbersForums.net

Hi Guys just after a bit of advice..
I own a mid terrace house that has a shared gutter down pipe. The pipe is approximately 45cm inside the border of my property.
Would anyone know if my neighbour is allowed to have his condensation pipe running into this gutter🤔🤔
Many thanks 👍
 

ShaunCorbs

Staff member
S. Mod
Plumber
Gas Engineer
Does it go to main drainage and not a soak away / run off ?
 

ShaunCorbs

Staff member
S. Mod
Plumber
Gas Engineer
Thanks Shaun
The gutter runs to the mains sewerage drain.
If it’s shared then yes might be worth having a look on the plans / deeds if unsure
 

scott_d

Plumber
Gas Engineer
Can you post a picture?
If it’s not bothering you I wouldn’t worry about it. Some times getting the condensate you a drain is very difficult.
 

garygvl

Gas Engineer
Advent Win
sometimes its pot luck which side of the fence the drain goes down.
 
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Darren Jackson

Esteemed
Plumber
Gas Engineer
Advent Win
As the down pipe serves more than one property and is shared then there is no problem. It would be courteous however to have asked you beforehand as the down pipe is after all on your property, but I can not see any harm done as long as it is done properly and is not an eyesore.
 

WC1

Gas Engineer
If it's not causing a problem it might be best to sit on it in case you need a favour from them in future?
 

Ric2013

Plumber
I wonder. Obviously there will be an easement (written or unwritten) allowing the neighbour's rainwater runoff from the roof to run along the gutter and discharge into the downpipe on the OP's side.

Assuming the neighbour is not running any new pipework outside of his or her boundary and the drain is a combined foul and surface water drain, then I wonder why the OP would want to refuse permission for the neighbour to also discharge condensate into that same gutter, although it may be the case that since there is no historical use of the gutter and pipe on the OP's side of the boundary for condensate, permission would need to be sought. The OP would do well to obtain legal advice from any free legal advice that may well be provided by his or her home insurance or trade union.

Understandably the OP may not be happy if they wish to use the downpipe for a water butt, if the downpipe is some material other than plastic that might actually be damaged by the condensate. If the pipe runs to a soakaway not specifically designed to take boiler condensate or to a municipal surface water drain then it should not be taking boiler condensate whoever owns it. Finally, if the neighbour is actually placing a condensate pipe on the OP's side of the boundary then that would also, I think, require permission.

The fact that the OP might have grounds to object does not necessarily mean he or she should, but that is another matter with which we are hardly able to pass judgement on.
 
From an aesthetic point of view. If I was the OP I would insist the existing rainwater pipe is tee’d and extended across the boundary in the same colour and diameter. Meaning the change in pipework from rainwater pipe to condensate pipe is located on the property that owns the boiler. It will look better and reduce issues for the OP with future maintenance.
 
Thanks all for taking the time for the advice much appreciated..My main worry was that numerous times in the past I have had to remove the drain pipe to clean. It covers 3 large properties for rainwater. That have loads of moss on their roofs...Now with this pipe it makes it more difficult, but that’s my neighbours worry I guess.. secondly with the condensation pipe penetrating the down pipe will it be more prone to blocking.. and as others have mentioned it would have been nice to be asked for permission..
Incidentally I’m not living in the house at the moment and it’s going to be up for sale soon. So hopefully it’s not going to be a deterrent for prospective buyers..
Thanks again...👍👍
 

Stigster

Esteemed
Plumber
secondly with the condensation pipe penetrating the down pipe will it be more prone to blocking
As long as the installer doesn't do something so daft as to push the condensate pipe right through the boss connection and into the bore of the downpipe it'll not make blockages any more likely.

You'd think that people were smart enough to not do that but I've seen it done sadly.
 

Darren Jackson

Esteemed
Plumber
Gas Engineer
Advent Win
I would like to see how they have joined the condensate pipe into the downpipe. You being concerned about possible blockages makes me think they have just drilled a hole in the side of the downpipe and pushed it into the hole actually penetrating the downpipe and restricting the bore of the pipe. It should be fitted into a suitable fitting designed to take the condensate pipe without restricting the downpipe. Any chance of a picture. It needs to be done right as gas safe are very strict on condensate runs and how they are terminated.
 

Ric2013

Plumber
I would like to see how they have joined the condensate pipe into the downpipe. You being concerned about possible blockages makes me think they have just drilled a hole in the side of the downpipe and pushed it into the hole actually penetrating the downpipe and restricting the bore of the pipe. It should be fitted into a suitable fitting designed to take the condensate pipe without restricting the downpipe. Any chance of a picture. It needs to be done right as gas safe are very strict on condensate runs and how they are terminated.
Agree. The plot thickens. The first post suggested the neighbour was merely running a pipe into his or her own gutter that discharges into the OP's downpipe, but this does not agree with what is said in subsequent posts.
 
Again thanks guys..
I will get over there this weekend and take some pictures to upload, I’m sure the down pipe was drilled and the condensate just pushed in though. But I’ll confirm with some pictures..👍
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Ric2013

Plumber
Well, if I were the OP and someone had done that to my pipe I'd be severely cheesed off. Apart from anything else, the downpipe may well leak during heavy rain.

Absolutely not the way to do it. Drilling a hole into the side of a pipe and shoving a pipe in does not constitute a connexion even if they have used sealant. No doubt the gas guys will be on shortly to comment on whether that contravenes gas legislation.
 

Darren Jackson

Esteemed
Plumber
Gas Engineer
Advent Win
Thanks for the picture. You are right to be concerned that is not the correct way to terminate a condensate pipe and is not acceptable and will compromise the bore of the down pipe leading to be prone to blockage. A tee joint should have been cut into the down pipe with a square to round 30mm reducer fitted to the tee joint. Also the external run of 30mm condensate should be insulated. So no this is not to regs and requires doing properly or reporting or both.
 

Ric2013

Plumber
Thanks for the picture. You are right to be concerned that is not the correct way to terminate a condensate pipe and is not acceptable and will compromise the bore of the down pipe leading to be prone to blockage. A tee joint should have been cut into the down pipe with a square to round 30mm reducer fitted to the tee joint. Also the external run of 30mm condensate should be insulated. So no this is not to regs and requires doing properly or reporting or both.
Would you actually reduce to 30mm and can you even get a 30mm reducer for rainwater pipe?

The impression I got from a display on the wall in a Worcester Bosch training centre is that the 'correct' way is to have the condensate pipe dropping into a hopper or socket (one size larger than the condensate pipe) coming off a tee such that there was an air break at the end of the condensate pipe and no possibility of rainwater inducing a vacuum on the condensate pipe. Perhaps it depends on the boiler manufacturer?

I suppose you'll say that the simple answer is for the OP to contact Gas Safe and request that they come and inspect the installation?
 
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Again thanks for your help guys. I know what course to take and have some good advice to follow.
Great forum, and a Merry Christmas to you all.
👍👍
 
The impression I got from a display on the wall in a Worcester Bosch training centre is that the 'correct' way is to have the condensate pipe dropping into a hopper or socket (one size larger than the condensate pipe) coming off a tee such that there was an air break at the end of the condensate pipe and no possibility of rainwater inducing a vacuum on the condensate pipe.
Another reason for doing it this way is to consider what happens if the downpipe gets blocked below the point of the condensate entry. The entire pipe can fill with water to a level above the boiler...

I had this happen in at my own home (the drainpipe full of water, not the condensate). I'd noticed a gutter spilling during rain so took a look at the gully at the foot of the downpipe. While thinking about the problem, I pulled on a weed growing out of the gulley. Won't make that mistake again. In less than a second the ca 50 litres of freezing cold water that was being supported by a plug of sand/silt and weed roots had crashed down and I was soaked from head to toe.
 

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